​​West Bloomfield Youth Assistance


West Bloomfield Youth Assistance © 2013  |  All Rights Reserved

4925 Orchard Lake Road West Bloomfield MI 48323  

248.592.1278            wbyouthassistance@yahoo.com




























STRENGTHENING FAMILIES BY THE CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF SOCIAL POLICY

​FIVE PROTECTIVE FACTORS:  Families gain what they need to be successful when five key protective factors are robust in their lives and communities.



1. PARENTAL RESILIENCE

No one can eliminate stress from parenting, but building parental resilience can effect how a parent deals with stress.  Parental resilience is the ability to constructively cope with and bounce back from all types of challenges.  It is about creatively solving problems, building trusting relationships, maintaining a positive attitude and seeking help when it is needed.


2. SOCIAL RESILIENCE

Friends, family members, neighbors, and other members of the community provide emotional support and concrete assistance to parents.  Social connections help parents build networks of support that serve multiple purposes: they can reinforce positive norms around childrearing, provide assistance in times of need, and serve as a resource for parenting information or help solving problems.  


3. CONCRETE SUPPORT IN TIMES OF NEED

Parents need access to the types of concrete supports and services that can minimize the stress of difficult situations, such as family crisis, a condition such as substance abuse, or stress associated with lack of resources.  Building this protective factor is about helping to ensure the basic needs of a family, such as food, clothing, and shelter, are met, as well as connecting parents and children to services, especially those that have a stigma associated with them, like domestic violence shelter or substance abuse counseling, in times of crisis.


4. KNOWLEDGE OF PARENTING AND CHILD DEVELOPMENT

Having accurate information about raising young children and appropriate expectations for their behavior help parents better understand and care for children.  It is important that information is available when parents need it and that it is relevant to their life and their child.  Parents whose own families used harsh discipline techniques or parents of children with developmental or behavior problems or special needs often require extra information and support.


5. SOCIAL AND EMOTIONAL COMPETENCE

A child's ability to interact positively with others, to self regulate, and to effectively communicate his or her emotions has a great impact on the parent-child relationship.  Children with challenging behaviors are more likely to be abused, so early identification and work with them helps keep their development on track and keep them safe.  Also. children who have experienced or witnessed violence need a safe environment that offers opportunities to develop normally.


Resilience to general life stress                                                                                                                 Resistance to parenting stress

Hope, optimism, self confidence                                                                                                           Not allowing stress to interfere with parenting 

Problem solving skills                                                                                                                           Positive attitude about parenting and child                                                                                                                                                                                             

                                                                                  Self care and willingness to ask for help                                                                           

                                                                                 Ability to manage negative emotions


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


STRESS & EARLY BRAIN GROWTH:UNDERSTANDING ADVERSE CHILDHOOD EXPERIENCES (ACEs)

by the Community & Family Services Division at the Spokane (WA) Regional Health District

                                

                                                                       What are ACE's?

ACE's are serious childhood traumas that result in toxic stress that can harm a child's brain.  This toxic stress may prevent a child from learning, from playing in a healthy way with other children, and can result in long term health problems.

Adverse Childhood Experiences can include:  emotional abuse, physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional neglect, physical neglect, mother treated violently, household mental illness, parental separation or divorce, incarcerated household member, bullying (by another child or adult), witnessing a brother or sister being abused, racism, sexism, or any form of discrimination, being homeless, and natural disasters and war


                                                         How do ACE's affect health?
Through Stress.  Frequent or prolonged exposure to ACE's can create toxic stress which can damage the developing brain of a child and affect overall health.

Examples: 

Reduces the ability to respond, learn, or figure things out, which can result in problems in school.

Lowers tolerance for stress, which can result in behaviors such as fighting, checking out or defiance.

Increases difficulty in making friends and maintaining relationships.

Increases problems with the learning and memory, which can be permanent.

Increases stress hormones which affects the body's ability to fight infection.

May cause lasting health problems.


                                                    It takes a village

Parents, teachers, and caregivers can help children by gaining an understanding of ACE's, helping children identify feelings and manage emotions, and creating safe physical and emotional environments at home, in school and in neighborhoods

                                                   Resilience Trumps ACE's!

1. Having resilient parents - parents who know how to solve problems, who have healthy relationships with other adults, and who build healthy relationships with their children.

2. Building attachment and nurturing relationships - adults who listen and respond patiently to a child in a supportive way, and pay attention to a child's physical and emotional needs.

3. Building social connections - having family, friends and/or neighbors who support, help and listen to children.

4. Meeting basic needs -  providing children with safe housing, nutritious food, appropriate clothing, and access to health care and good education.

5. Learning about parenting and how children grow - understanding how parents can help their children grow in a healthy way, and what to expect from children as they grow.

6. Building social and emotional skills- helping children interact in a healthy way with others, manage their emotions and communicate their feelings and needs.

For more information visit:

​www.acestoohigh.com/aces-101/

www.resiliencetrumpsACEs.org